Online Learning Archive

Muslim Journeys and Your Community: Managing Controversy, Maximizing Impact

Islam is the second-most widely practiced faith in the world, and international news items focus on events in Muslim-majority societies daily. Librarians face the unique challenge of reaching patrons with requested information and programming regarding this often unfamiliar culture, while managing reactions from others who may hold Islamophobic or anti-Muslim prejudices.

Librarians participating in the NEH’s Bridging Cultures Muslim Journeys initiative were invited to attend this free webinar to learn more about best practices for implementing successful Muslim Journeys programs, and responding effectively to intellectual freedom challenges. Other interested programming librarians were also welcome.

Martin Garnar, chair of ALA’s Committee on Professional Ethics, and Lesley Williams, Muslim Journeys project director from the Evanston Public Library, shared ideas and best practices based on their own experiences.


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Guides for Community Discussions: National Issues Forums (NIF) and Others

Please join us for this free, one-hour webinar about issue books, videos, and other guides available to help librarians bring their communities together to talk in productive, civil, and interesting ways. A growing and diverse array of nonpartisan, non-agenda-driven materials about important public issues are available from the National Issues Forum Institute and other sources.

Presenters for this webinar include: Patty Dineen from the National Issues Forum Institute, and Carolyn Caywood, and Nancy Kranich, both from ALA’s Center for Civic Life. They will review and show examples of available materials; describe how these guides can support engaging library programs; and give examples of how librarians have used them in their communities. Time will be available at the end of the webinar for Q&A as well as suggestions and stories.

This webinar is the fifth in a civic engagement series produced by Programming Librarian and is sponsored by the ALA Center for Civic Life and the ALA Cultural Communities Fund.


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Libraries Transforming Communities: Community Engagement Conversations

A free follow-up to a conversation session presented at the 2013 ALA Midwinter Meeting, this webinar explored how to effectively use the conversation guide How Librarians and Libraries Can Lead Community Conversations for Change. This webinar provided concrete suggestions for hosting community conversations as well as opportunities to ask questions about how to move from conversation to action as part of the engagement work of libraries. Presenters: Cheryl Gorman, Vice President National Programs, Harwood Institute for Public Innovation; and Mary Davis Fournier, Deputy Director, ALA Public Programs Office.


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Eat Your Words: Hosting an Edible Book Festival

Kristin Boyett, a librarian at the University of North Texas Wills Library, will offer a snapshot of Edible Books events from years past at the university as well as provide tips for how to conduct a successful program, including how to alter it to suit various audiences and facilities. Learn how much fun it can be to attend and host!

Participants will be leave the session with a general blueprint on how to host their own Edible Books Festival as well as ideas on how to make it both successful and personalized to their needs.

Engage! Teens, Art & Civic Participation: Creating Local, Issues-Based Programming

The Engage! Teens, Art & Civic Participation webinar series will introduce a program model that targets young adults, using visual art as a springboard to civic engagement. Originally piloted in ten Illinois libraries in 2010, Engage! Teens, Art & Civic Participation is an activity- and discussion-based program model featuring a selection of curated and compelling images of American art.

During these three free webinars, participants will:

  • Hear from librarians who participated in the Engage! pilot program, who will share what worked and what didn’lt with teens.
  • Be introduced to a free PDF guide to the Engage! model, featuring detailed instructions on how to get started.
  • Learn how to formulate effective “looking questions” that will elicit participation and engagement with art and thematic content.
  • Learn how to select images that will illuminate relevant civic participation issues for teen discussion and learning.

Please be sure to register for all three sessions. This project was inspired by the National Endowment for the Humanities’l Picturing America project. Funding for Engage! is provided by the Searle Funds at the Chicago Community Trust and from the Terra Foundation for American Art.

This session will focus on issues based discussions for teen audiences, using the Engage! Teens, Art & Civic Participation model. Adam Davis, Director for the Project on Civic Reflection and an advisor to the Engage! project, will walk webinar participants through how to identify locally relevant issues and images for issues-based teen programming, and Christie Chandler-Stahl, formerly of the Evanston (Ill.) Public Library and currently at the Rakow Branch of the Gail Borden Public Library District in Elgin, Illinois, will share how this approach worked in her library.

Can’ make it on May 15? You can still register for the webinar, and we will notify you as soon as the webinar is archived and available for on-demand viewing at your convenience!


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Engage! Teens, Art & Civic Participation: Creating Compelling Discussion through Art

The Engage! Teens, Art & Civic Participation webinar series will introduce a program model that targets young adults, using visual art as a springboard to civic engagement. Originally piloted in ten Illinois libraries in 2010, Engage! Teens, Art & Civic Participation is an activity- and discussion-based program model featuring a selection of curated and compelling images of American art.

During these three free webinars, participants will:

  • Hear from librarians who participated in the Engage! pilot program, who will share what worked and what didn’lt with teens.
  • Be introduced to a free PDF guide to the Engage! model, featuring detailed instructions on how to get started.
  • Learn how to formulate effective “looking questions” that will elicit participation and engagement with art and thematic content.
  • Learn how to select images that will illuminate relevant civic participation issues for teen discussion and learning.

Please be sure to register for all three sessions. This project was inspired by the National Endowment for the Humanities’l Picturing America project. Funding for Engage! is provided by the Searle Funds at the Chicago Community Trust and from the Terra Foundation for American Art.

This second session will delve in to how to present and look at art. Sarah Alvarez, Director of Teacher Programs at the Art Institute of Chicago, will discuss how to ask looking questions and frame issues and activities. Brandy Morrill, an Engage! pilot librarian at the Chinatown Branch of the Chicago Public Library, will share how this adaptable approach worked in her library.

Can’ make it on April 17? You can still register for the webinar, and we will notify you as soon as the webinar is archived and available for on-demand viewing at your convenience!


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Engage! Teens, Art & Civic Participation: An Introduction

The Engage! Teens, Art & Civic Participation webinar series will introduce a program model that targets young adults, using visual art as a springboard to civic engagement. Originally piloted in ten Illinois libraries in 2010, Engage! Teens, Art & Civic Participation is an activity- and discussion-based program model featuring a selection of curated and compelling images of American art.

During these three free webinars, participants will:

  • Hear from librarians who participated in the Engage! pilot program, who will share what worked and what didn’lt with teens.
  • Be introduced to a free PDF guide to the Engage! model, featuring detailed instructions on how to get started.
  • Learn how to formulate effective “looking questions” that will elicit participation and engagement with art and thematic content.
  • Learn how to select images that will illuminate relevant civic participation issues for teen discussion and learning.

Please be sure to register for all three sessions. This project was inspired by the National Endowment for the Humanities’l Picturing America project. Funding for Engage! is provided by the Searle Funds at the Chicago Community Trust and from the Terra Foundation for American Art.

In this first session, learn more about this program model for young adults that uses visual art as a springboard to civic engagement. Two librarians who participated in the pilot project—Marcus Lumpkin, Youmedia, Chicago Public Library; and Tom Spicer, Arlington Heights (Ill.) Memorial Library—shared their programs and how they can be adapted for other libraries; in addition, a free project resource guide was debuted during this webinar.


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Using Webisodes to Take Your Teen Programming to Them, Where They Are, When They Are!

As high school librarians, we know that the students aren’t always “tuned in” to library programming during school hours, so we’ve taken our programming to them where they are, when they are … online! Using humor and parody the librarian team of Mr. Heck and Mrs. Darnay created the webisode style series, “DarnitalltoHeck,“ to deliver reader’s advisory, book talks, library contests, special events, and more. By going to where the students “live” and allowing them access to our programming on their schedule, we not only increased our library circulation and visitations, but we also created an unexpected aura of celebrity to the librarians!

Webinar participants will gain ideas for creating thematic scripts to tie the webisodes together; learn about the technology used to create the videos and to post online; and discover the benefits beyond the students by using these videos for advocacy of your library program to the administration/stakeholders.

Speakers: Lena Darnay, School Librarian Pike High School Freshman Center, former music industry advertising executive, current adjunct professor of information literacy in the College of Ed at Butler University, Indianapolis. Chad Heck, School Librarian at Pike High School 10–12 Campus, former technology trainer for Pike Township Schools, current law student at Indiana University, Indianapolis.

Registration: $25 for ALA members; $35 for nonmembers; $140 for group.

Digital Littles at the Library: Teaching Digital Literacy

The Indianapolis Public Library has developed a hands-on technology lab for early learners to develop literacy skills in a technology based environment. The Digital Littles lab contains technology tools such as cameras, video cameras, and laptops that assist librarians in developing storytimes and other activities. The mobile lab is designed to travel mostly to library locations, but can also be transported to schools, day cares, and other organizations. The lab is the library’s way of reaching out to the community and making technology more accessible.

Webinar participants gained a better understanding about how to develop activities that combine storytelling and technology for early learners. Targeting promotion of the lab and maintaining a collaborative relationship with schools, daycares, and other organizations is necessary to the success of the programs. Participants also learned more about the logistics of acquiring and maintaining a digital mobile lab.

Speakers: Raylene Jordan is a Librarian and lead Program Specialist for the Learning Curve at Central Library, a high-tech area of the library that creates and models new ways of introducing children to technology and its uses at the library. She has worked with the library to develop activities in the Learning Curve since it became a reality in 2007. Abby Brown has a Master’s degree in Early Childhood Education. She has taught children in public schools, developed programs at the Indianapolis Children’s Museum, and worked at the Indianapolis Public Library as an Early Literacy Specialist coordinating early childhood programming.

Fee: $25 for ALA members; $35 for nonmembers; $140 for group.

Let’s Talk About It: The National Model for Scholar-Led Reading and Discussion

For more than thirty years, hundreds of libraries across the country have engaged their communities by offering “Let’s Talk About It” reading and discussion programs. Find out how from an LTAI state-level coordinator and twenty-four-year veteran! Webinar attendees were offered an overview of the model, tips for recruiting and working with a scholar, and access to an archive of ready-to-present program content on more than thirty themes.

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