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Obscure Holidays: Fun for Everyone

cwhittall's picture
Chocolate chip cookies

This month, I’ve handed the spotlight to a dear friend who always knows what obscure holiday it may be and how to celebrate it! Kami Bumgardner is the youth services coordinator at Maitland Public Library in Maitland, Fla., and works primarily with toddlers and kids through fifth grade. Any questions or comments will be forwarded to her. Enjoy!

 

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MegaMania

Cosplayers in costume, holding light sabers

MegaMania is an annual event that aims to bring educational aspects of comic book and cosplay culture to youth who may not otherwise have access to large comic cons. Though planned primarily for teens, people of all ages are welcome to attend and explore cosplay opportunities, gaming demonstrations, local author panels, art workshops and more.

8 Ways to Save Money on Programming in a Tiny Library (Part 2)

cprice's picture
A group of women lined up in the library

In last month's post, "8 Ways to Save Money on Programming in a Tiny Library (Part 1)," I offered four strategies that have helped me stretch my small programming budget to its limits. I talked about looking to friends and family for free programming; tapping resources in your community; partnering with other organizations; and turning your own passions into programs.

LibraryGame

One finished game made by a student.

The Librarygame project teaches fifth graders the concepts of storytelling, technology and project management through the creation of video games. The program is a collaboration between Sacramento Public Library and local Title I schools, many of which lack the funds to hold this type of program without a partner.

Bigger on the Inside: Programming for Small Spaces

Drawing from her decade of experience as the director of a small, rural New York library, Hope Decker will offer tips and tricks to help you maximize your library's event space, ranging from design tricks to how to make the space itself seem larger. She will also share innovative program ideas that are perfect for tiny areas. 

Participants of this session will:

Oldies but Goodies: Spiffing Up Existing Programs for Older Adults

rstarr's picture
People smile while holding baked treats from a tray.

With Older Americans Month coming up in May, now is a great time to review your list of upcoming programs under a new lens. During her speech at the ALA Midwinter Meeting in January 2016, AARP's Jo Ann Jenkins identified three key areas we can address for our aging population: health, wealth and self. Do you have any programs that fall into these categories? If so, are they marketed toward older adults?

Connecting Sentences

Speaker at Connecting Sentences exhibition

Writing is an agent of change. It begins with a sentence and leads to a connection, a kinship with a reader and the building of a community. It grows into a realization that each of us has a story to tell that emerges from the sum of our best — and worst — moments.

Let's Talk About

Let's Talk About logo from Sacramento Public Library

The Let’s Talk About program is a new series designed to engage the community in deeper discussions about noteworthy subjects that are often difficult to talk about. The library announces the subject, provides book lists to encourage a deeper dive into that theme, offers a safe place for the discussion, and coordinates the experts and authors who inspire and lead the program for more open conversations.

Previous Let's Talk About conversations centered around death, racism and voting, and our library plans to host more programs in 2017.

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